List of Rolling Stone’s best albums and best songs of 2010

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(Rolling Stone) — 5. Jamey Johnson, “The Guitar Song”
1: What does Jamey Johnson keep under all of that hair? Songs. Nashville’s gruffest and grittiest star turns out to be its most reliable traditionalist, a Music Row pro who can write a song for every emotional season. Johnson pulled out a whole slew of them — 25, clocking in north of 105 minutes — for his double-disc fourth album: acoustic confessions and rugged boogie blues, big weepers and grim reapers, cover tunes and novelty ditties, not to mention “California Riots” and “Playing the Part,” a pair of fiercely funny, unrepentantly redneck swipes at the frou-frou blue states.
4. Arcade Fire, “The Suburbs”
Arcade Fire don’t do anything small — so leave it to the Montreal collective to make an album of vast, orchestral rock that locates the battle for the human soul amid big houses and manicured lawns.
“The Suburbs” is the band’s most adventurous album yet: See the psychotic speed strings on “Empty Room,” the Crazy Horse rush of “Month of May,” the synth-pop disco of “Sprawl II (Mountains Beyond Mountains).” Win Butler and his wife, Régine Chassagne, sing about suburban boredom, fear of change and wanting to have a kid of their own — always scaling their intimate confessions to arena-rock levels and finding beauty wherever they look.
3. Elton John and Leon Russell, “The Union”
Two rock giants, one largely forgotten, rekindle a friendship and make music that ranks with their best. Producer T Bone Burnett delivers his most spectacular production in memory, filled with shining steel guitar, chortling brass and gospel-time choirs. Ultimately, it’s Russell’s voice that shines brightest, drawing on the entire history of American popular music in its canny, vulnerable, knowing croon.
Rolling Stone’s top five singles of 2010
2. The Black Keys, “Brothers”
The duo boil it down on their best record yet: vivid tunes stripped bare and rubbed raw, with hot splashes of color and hooks popping through like compound fractures. “Howlin’ for You” smears gnarly blues over a glam beat cribbed from Gary Glitter’s “Rock and Roll Part 2,” while a cover of Jerry Butler’s broken-hearted hit “Never Give You Up” takes Dan Auerbach’s falsetto-flashing soulman persona to the next level. It’s rock minimalism pushed to the max.
1. Kanye West, “My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy”
With “My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy”, Kanye West made music as sprawlingly messy as his life. When he wasn’t feuding with Matt Lauer or bugging out on Twitter, Kanye was building hip-hop epics, songs full of the kind of grandiose gestures that only the foolish attempt and only the wildly talented pull off.
The more he piled on — string sections, Elton John piano solos, vocoder freakouts, Bon Iver cameos, King Crimson and Rick James samples — the better the music got. Never has Kanye rhymed so hilariously (“Have you ever had sex with a pharaoh? I put the [expletive] in a sarcophagus”) or been so insightful about his relationship-torpedoing faults.
From the bracing prog-rock of “Power” to the spooky grandeur of “Runaway” to the shape-shifting “Hell of a Life,” he made all other music seem dimmer and duller. Is the album dark? Sure. Twisted? Of course. But above all, it’s beautiful.

(Rolling Stone) — 5. Jamey Johnson, “The Guitar Song”
1: What does Jamey Johnson keep under all of that hair? Songs. Nashville’s gruffest and grittiest star turns out to be its most reliable traditionalist, a Music Row pro who can write a song for every emotional season. Johnson pulled out a whole slew of them — 25, clocking in north of 105 minutes — for his double-disc fourth album: acoustic confessions and rugged boogie blues, big weepers and grim reapers, cover tunes and novelty ditties, not to mention “California Riots” and “Playing the Part,” a pair of fiercely funny, unrepentantly redneck swipes at the frou-frou blue states.4. Arcade Fire, “The Suburbs”
Arcade Fire don’t do anything small — so leave it to the Montreal collective to make an album of vast, orchestral rock that locates the battle for the human soul amid big houses and manicured lawns.”The Suburbs” is the band’s most adventurous album yet: See the psychotic speed strings on “Empty Room,” the Crazy Horse rush of “Month of May,” the synth-pop disco of “Sprawl II (Mountains Beyond Mountains).” Win Butler and his wife, Régine Chassagne, sing about suburban boredom, fear of change and wanting to have a kid of their own — always scaling their intimate confessions to arena-rock levels and finding beauty wherever they look.3. Elton John and Leon Russell, “The Union”
Two rock giants, one largely forgotten, rekindle a friendship and make music that ranks with their best. Producer T Bone Burnett delivers his most spectacular production in memory, filled with shining steel guitar, chortling brass and gospel-time choirs. Ultimately, it’s Russell’s voice that shines brightest, drawing on the entire history of American popular music in its canny, vulnerable, knowing croon.Rolling Stone’s top five singles of 20102. The Black Keys, “Brothers” The duo boil it down on their best record yet: vivid tunes stripped bare and rubbed raw, with hot splashes of color and hooks popping through like compound fractures. “Howlin’ for You” smears gnarly blues over a glam beat cribbed from Gary Glitter’s “Rock and Roll Part 2,” while a cover of Jerry Butler’s broken-hearted hit “Never Give You Up” takes Dan Auerbach’s falsetto-flashing soulman persona to the next level. It’s rock minimalism pushed to the max.1. Kanye West, “My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy”With “My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy”, Kanye West made music as sprawlingly messy as his life. When he wasn’t feuding with Matt Lauer or bugging out on Twitter, Kanye was building hip-hop epics, songs full of the kind of grandiose gestures that only the foolish attempt and only the wildly talented pull off.The more he piled on — string sections, Elton John piano solos, vocoder freakouts, Bon Iver cameos, King Crimson and Rick James samples — the better the music got. Never has Kanye rhymed so hilariously (“Have you ever had sex with a pharaoh? I put the [expletive] in a sarcophagus”) or been so insightful about his relationship-torpedoing faults.From the bracing prog-rock of “Power” to the spooky grandeur of “Runaway” to the shape-shifting “Hell of a Life,” he made all other music seem dimmer and duller. Is the album dark? Sure. Twisted? Of course. But above all, it’s beautiful.

Rolling Stone’s Best Albums of 2010

1. Kanye West, My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy
2. The Black Keys, Brothers
3. Elton John and Leon Russell, The Union
4. Arcade Fire, The Suburbs
5. Jamey Johnson, The Guitar Song
6. Vampire Weekend, Contra
7. Drake, Thank Me Later
8. Robert Plant, Band of Joy
9. Eminem, Recovery
10. LCD Soundsystem, This Is Happening
11. The Dead Weather, Sea of Cowards
12. John Mellencamp, No Better Than This
13. Taylor Swift, Speak Now
14. Robyn, Body Talk
15. The National, High Violet
16. Kid Rock, Born Free
17. Beach House, Teen Dream
18. Kings of Leon, Come Around Sundown
19. M.I.A., Maya
20. Neil Young, Le Noise
21. Big Boi, Sir Lucious Left Foot: The Son of Chico Dusty ///
22. Spoon, Transference
23. Elizabeth Cook, Welder
24. Maximum Balloon, Maximum Balloon
25. Superchunk, Majesty Shredding
26. Yeasayer, Odd Blood
27. Peter Wolf, Midnight Souvenirs
28. My Chemical Romance, Danger Days: The True Lives of the Fabulous Killjoys
29. The Roots, How I Got Over
30. Rick Ross, Teflon Don Top ten ranking of the best records as follows:

A list of the 50 best tracks of 2010, selected by Rolling Stone, Kanye West again led with the “Runaway”. “Silver” journalists awarded the song “Fuck You” by rapper C-Lo Green, and “bronze” – “Soldier of Love” Sade.
Rolling Stone’s Best Singles of 2010
1. Kanye West feat. Pusha T, “Runaway”
2. Cee Lo Green, “Fuck You”
3. Sade, “Soldier of Love”
4. Katy Perry, “Teenage Dream”
5. Arcade Fire, “We Used to Wait
6. Mavis Staples, “You Are Not Alone”
7. Vampire Weekend, “White Sky”
8. Janelle Monáe feat. Big Boi, “Tightrope”
9. Broken Bells, “The Ghost Inside”
10. Kanye West feat. Jay-Z, Rick Ross, Nicki Minaj and Bon Iver, “Monster”
11. The Black Keys, “Everlasting Light”
12. Mark Ronson and the Business International feat. Q-Tip and MNDR, “Bang Bang Bang”
13. The Dead Weather, “Hustle and Cuss”
14. Big Boi feat. Cutty, “Shutterbugg”
15. Drake, “Over”
16. Cold War Kids, “Coffee Spoon”
17. LCD Soundsystem, “I Can Change”
18. Jenny and Johnny, “Scissor Runner”
19. The New Pornographers, “Your Hands (Together)”
20. Best Coast, “Boyfriend”
21. Sleigh Bells, “Infinity Guitars”
22. Rick Ross feat. Styles P, “B.M.F. (Blowin’ Money Fast)”
23. Jamey Johnson, “Macon”
24. Eminem, “Not Afraid”
25. Nicki Minaj, “Did It On’em”
26. Robyn, “Dancing on My Own”
27. The National, “Bloodbuzz Ohio”
28. Band of Horses, “Laredo”
29. Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, “The Trip to Pirate’s Cove”
30. Jakob Dylan, “Nothing but the Whole Wide World”
31. Gil Scott-Heron, “I’m New Here”
32. Die Antwoord, “Enter the Ninja”
33. Wavves, “Post Acid”
34. Gorillaz feat. Mos Def and Bobby Womack, “Stylo”
35. Massive Attack feat. Hope Sandoval, “Paradise Circus”
36. Drake feat. Nicki Minaj, “Up All Night”
37. Lloyd Banks feat. Juelz Santana, “Beamer, Benz, or Bentley”
38. Spoon, “The Mystery Zone”
39. The Gaslight Anthem, “The Diamond Church Street Choir”
40. Kanye West, “Power”
41. Junip, “In Every Direction”
42. Surfer Blood, “Floating Vibes”
43. B.o.B. feat. Bruno Mars, “Nothing on You”
44. Neil Young, “Love and War”
45. The Rolling Stones, “Plundered My Soul”
46. MGMT, “Congratulations”
47. Kid Rock, “Born Free”
48. Das Racist, “hahahaha jk?”
49. Elizabeth Cook, “El Camino”
50. Ke$ha, “We R Who We R”

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